drowningintheseaoflove

I wasn’t a ‘child star’ in the sense of, say, Shirley Temple. But I can sympathize with some of the problems that people like Judy Garland and Jackie Cooper went through. By the time I arrived, there were laws to protect you, to ensure that you got proper schooling and that you actually got to see the money you earned. One particularly difficult time was when I was making “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” (1947) and “Miracle on 34th Street” simultaneously. One was a period film, the other a contemporary; in one I was a sweet kid, in the other a bratty kid. That is difficult for a 9-year-old to handle. That’s one of the reasons I later went into analysis — to sort all that out.

I wasn’t a ‘child star’ in the sense of, say, Shirley Temple. But I can sympathize with some of the problems that people like Judy Garland and Jackie Cooper went through. By the time I arrived, there were laws to protect you, to ensure that you got proper schooling and that you actually got to see the money you earned. One particularly difficult time was when I was making “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” (1947) and “Miracle on 34th Street” simultaneously. One was a period film, the other a contemporary; in one I was a sweet kid, in the other a bratty kid. That is difficult for a 9-year-old to handle. That’s one of the reasons I later went into analysis — to sort all that out.

in-love-with-the-1950s

I wasn’t a ‘child star’ in the sense of, say, Shirley Temple. But I can sympathize with some of the problems that people like Judy Garland and Jackie Cooper went through. By the time I arrived, there were laws to protect you, to ensure that you got proper schooling and that you actually got to see the money you earned. One particularly difficult time was when I was making “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” (1947) and “Miracle on 34th Street” simultaneously. One was a period film, the other a contemporary; in one I was a sweet kid, in the other a bratty kid. That is difficult for a 9-year-old to handle. That’s one of the reasons I later went into analysis — to sort all that out.

I wasn’t a ‘child star’ in the sense of, say, Shirley Temple. But I can sympathize with some of the problems that people like Judy Garland and Jackie Cooper went through. By the time I arrived, there were laws to protect you, to ensure that you got proper schooling and that you actually got to see the money you earned. One particularly difficult time was when I was making “The Ghost and Mrs. Muir” (1947) and “Miracle on 34th Street” simultaneously. One was a period film, the other a contemporary; in one I was a sweet kid, in the other a bratty kid. That is difficult for a 9-year-old to handle. That’s one of the reasons I later went into analysis — to sort all that out.